Douglas Inn & Suites - 2600 Westside Drive, Cleveland, TN 37312 | Tel. (423) 559-5579

Attractions

The community offers a seasonal climate, major transportation advantages, a diversified economy, traditional family values and a natural playground set against a picturesque backdrop. What more could you want?

Arts and Culture

Arts activities give flavor to life in the Ocoee Region. Find information on arts events and cultural offerings hosted by Allied Arts Council and other local groups. Also find information about the beautiful painted quilt squares of the AQT.

Allied Arts Council

Mission: Educate the community regarding the value of the arts to their quality of life and promote and support the local arts community.

The Allied Arts Council is responsible for Evening Shade , Chair-ries Jubilee and many other events that promote arts and culture in the area.

Evening Shade Concerts in the Park are FREE family-friendly evenings of musical entertainment held every Friday night in May in Johnston Park in Historic Downtown Cleveland. The concerts begin at 6:30 p.m. Bring a lawnchair or blanket and enjoy a relaxed evening with family and friends.

Chair-ries Jubilee is an annual auction designed to raise funds for Arts in Education and art-related activities in Cleveland and Bradley County.

Did you know that arts in our schools benefit from the annual Allied Arts Council auction? Chair-ries Jubilee has raised over $225,000 since 2000.

Whitewater/Outdoor

Welcome to the Great Outdoors!
The Ocoee Region has everything you could want to do outside!

Ocoee Zip Lines

Ocoee Zip Lines (OZ) is the Ocoee River's first major adventure activity, since whitewater sports began on the Ocoee in 1976. Over a mile of zipline fun will get your adrenaline pumping from start to finish! Kids from 5 to 105 will enjoy this zipline. Open 7 days per week/ 12 months of year.

Whitewater Rafting

Shoot the rapids on America's only Olympic River, the Ocoee River. Located just 20 miles east of Cleveland, Tennessee, the Ocoee River with its class III and IV whitewater rapids is one of the South's most popular whitewater rivers. The Ocoee was the site of the 1996 Olympic Whitewater Competition.

Anyone age 12 or over can enjoy the rapids of the Ocoee on guided raft trips offered by outfitters. These guided trips are available weekends
April-October and weekdays June-August.

Cherokee National Forest
With 625,000 acres of unspoiled natural beauty, the Cherokee National Forest is a fabulous Tennessee vacation spot that offers dozens of exciting and relaxing recreational opportunities. Among many activities enjoyed by thousands each year are camping, hiking, picnicking, hunting, fishing, swimming and boating on Parksville Lake. The forest's Scenic Byway, the first scenic byway designated in the nation, winds along Parksville Lake and the Ocoee River. Mountaintops overlooking the Chilhowee recreational area provide breathtaking scenes. Parking fees in some areas.
423-476-9700. Fall Color Hotline 1-800-354-4595 www.fs.usda.gov/cherokee

Hiwassee Scenic River
The Hiwassee River is the first designated State Scenic River in Tennessee. A 23-mile river section from the Tennessee-North Carolina state line to U.S. Hwy. 411 north of Benton has been declared a Class III partially developed river. The river offers a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities such as canoeing, fishing, hiking and nature photography in the northern section, and skiing and boating in Charleston (North Bradley County). Numerous public access sites provide boat-launching ramps. Picnic areas, sanitary facilities and primitive camping are also available. 423-338-5201 http://www.tennessee.gov/environment/parks/Hiwassee/

Ocoee River
Located in the Cherokee National Forest in Polk County, the Ocoee River offers various skill levels of kayaking, canoeing and whitewater rafting. The Ocoee River's Class III and IV rapids make it the most popular whitewater river in the nation and site for the 1996 Olympic Whitewater events.

Red Clay State Historic Park
The last of the council grounds of the Cherokee Nation before their removal along the tragic Trail of Tears are located here. A Cherokee farm and council house of the period have been replicated to offer visitors a glimpse of how the area might have looked 150 years ago. The sacred council spring produces over 400,000 gallons of sapphire-blue water a day, providing the area's long-ago residents with fresh spring water. An interpretative center houses a theater, exhibits and artifacts. Recreational facilities include a 500-seat amphitheater, a picnic pavilion, picnic area with grills and tables, and a two-mile loop trail with a beautiful limestone overlook tower. Limited handicap accessibility. The park is open 8 a.m.-sunset, March to November; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., December-February, Closed December 22 to January 1. Take Blue Springs Road or Dalton Pike off Hwy. 64 Bypass and follow signs. 423-478-0339 www.state.tn.us/environment/parks/RedClay

Conasauga River
This river begins high in the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Georgia and descends rapidly north into Tennessee. The Conasauga is a great place for swimming, fishing, hunting, snorkeling and boating. It is also the habitat for over 70 species of fish (including 25 rare varieties) and 10 species of freshwater mussels. For more information contact the Conasauga River Alliance at 706-695-3950. www.conasaugariver.net

AgriTourism

Taste, Touch, Feel...Experience Life On The Farm!
That's What AgriTourism Is All About

Apple Valley Orchard
Start your Cleveland, Tennessee vacation with a trip to the orchard! Apple Valley Orchard is located at 351 Weese Road, SE. The farmer's market and bakery welcome visitors with a variety of foods, including delicious fresh apple goods. Apple Valley Orchard was recently featured in Southern Living and Farm Bureau magazines. Limited handicap accessibility.
1-800- 503-1433/423-472-3044

Mayfield Dairy Farms Visitor's Center
Come visit the largest and most popular dairy in the southeast! Since 1910, this fourth generation dairy has been the most innovative in the nation, constantly coming up with new processes that produce fresher-tasting, longer lasting dairy products. Based in Athens, TN, just a few minutes north of Cleveland, Mayfield Dairy Farms serves nine Southeastern states and produces the number one selling 2% milk in the nation. Come visit the Visitors Center and see firsthand how Mayfield produces the South's favorite ice cream and milk, then visit the gift shop where you can buy a generous scoop of delicious Mayfield Ice Cream! 1-800-MAYFIELD

Morris Vineyard & Winery
Open daily 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sundays 12 p.m. – 7 p.m. From July 4 – late October hours are extended to 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. for picking your own blueberries, grapes and muscadines. The winery is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas days.
Morris Vineyard is a family-owned and –operated vineyard and winery located in the foothills of east Tennessee. The winery produces a vast selection of fine wines for all tastes, all produced and bottled on location in Charleston, Tenn. Morris Vineyard is one of the few vineyards that still offer pick-your-own-fruit. Come experience your wine amidst the natural beauty and charm of the foothills of Tennessee, along with incredible views of the Appalachian Mountains. Call for pick-your-own-fruit availability. 423-479-7311

Tri-State Exhibition Center
A multipurpose facility located off I-75, Exit 20, is available for a variety of events such as livestock shows, rodeos, music festivals, and horse and dog shows. The Center is home to the White Oak Mountain Bluegrass Festival, held in July, as well as several well-respected horse shows. Two barns with 178 stalls, two outdoor arenas and a 70,400 square foot covered arena with bleachers are available. Call 423-476-9310

Cherokee Nation

Passport to Cherokee History

Travel back in time by exploring historic sites in the quaint southern towns of Charleston, Calhoun and Cleveland, Tennessee. The south side of the Hiwassee River, present-day Charleston, was once the location of the federal Cherokee Indian Agency (1820-1833), which provided protection for the Cherokee people. In prior years, this agency had been responsible for issuing passports for visitors to enter the Cherokee Nation. This brochure explores many of the significant Cherokee historical sites in Bradley County, such as the last eastern homeplace of Chief John Ross , the original home of his brother Lewis Ross , the non-extant location of Fort Cass and Rattlesnake Springs which were the infamous holding camps for the Cherokee during the first stage of the Trail of Tears .This brochure is available to download here or you can click here to order your Passport .

Red Clay Historical Park

Red Clay served as the capital (1832 - 1838) and the last council grounds of the Cherokee Nation before their removal along the tragic Trail of Tears. A Cherokee farm and council house of the period have been replicated to offer visitors a glimpse of how the area might have looked 150 years ago. The sacred council spring produces over 400,000 gallons of sapphire-blue water a day, providing the area's long-ago residents with fresh spring water. An interpretative center houses a theater, exhibits and artifacts. Recreational facilities include a 500-seat amphitheater, a picnic pavilion, picnic area with grills and tables, and a two-mile loop trail with a beautiful limestone overlook tower. Limited handicap accessibility. The park is open 8 a.m.-sunset, March to November; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., December-February, Closed December 22 to January 1. Take Blue Springs Road or Dalton Pike off Hwy. 64 Bypass and follow signs. 423-478-0339

Nancy Ward Grave

At the age of 17, Nancy Ward earned the name of Ghighau or “Beloved Woman” for her valor on the battlefield after her husband, a Cherokee warrior, died in battle and she valiantly took his place, rallying her fellow fighters to victory. This act of bravery catapulted Nancy into many positions of power in the Cherokee governing systems, among them, the Women's Council and the Council of Chiefs. Her high standing among her people, her remarriage in the 1750s to English trader Bryant Ward, and her desire for peaceful coexistence made Nancy a trusted liaison to the newly arriving white settlers. Nancy would use her considerable influence in the Cherokee Nation innumerable times to negotiate peace treaties between both the English colonists and later, the emerging United States government and her native people. She is buried beside the graves of her son Five Killer and brother Long Fellow. In 1923, the Nancy Ward Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a monument on her grave. Newsweek.com named Nancy Ward 1 st on a timeline of women Political Pioneers.

The grave site is located in neighboring Polk County off Hwy 411 heading into Benton from Cleveland.

Cherokee Chieftain

The Cherokee Chieftain, carved from a tree along Parker Street by widely-acclaimed sculptor Peter Wolf Toth, was presented to the city of Cleveland, Tennessee as a gift in 1974. The Chieftain is one of the focal points of downtown Cleveland and stands as a proud reminder of the region's significant Cherokee Indian heritage. The Chieftain may be seen on the grounds of the Museum Center at 5ive Points on Inman Street.

Hair Conrad Cabin at Blythewood Farms

In the early 1800s, the area was inhabited primarily by Cherokees, among them Tekahskeh, or Hair Conrad as he came to be known. Conrad, a "man of means" and leader of the first detachment of Cherokees from Rattlesnake Springs on the infamous Trail of Tears, built his cabin in the architectural style of white settlers during the early 1800s. The cabin, the oldest residential structure in Bradley County, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Blythewood is a working farm, breeding championship show horses. It is best to call for a tour of the farm and cabin so someone can be there to greet you. 433 Blythewood Road SW, 423-476-8942

We Shall Remain
PBS

For an interesting look at history from the Native American's perspective, be sure to check out WE SHALL REMAIN , a documentary that is available through the PBS network . The series may be viewed online and we in Bradley County are extremely excited about this film, since scenes for the Trail of Tears segment were filmed at Red Clay State Historic Park.

Eco Tourism

Blue Moon Cruises on the River

Join the Blue Moon on a naturalist-guided boat trip through the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge. Thousands of sandhill cranes make this their feeding ground September - February. Several other species of wildlife and birds make this their home, including the bald eagle. Hear tales of local history from your hosts and enjoy beautiful scenery in all four seasons, as cruises run year round. The boat is available as a charter vessel for parties, special events and fall color cruises. Catering is also available.
(888) 993-BLUE www.bluemooncruises.org

Cherokee Heritage Wildlife Weekend

Located just north of Cleveland, Tennesee is the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge. Thousands of migrating sandhill cranes make the Hiwassee Refuge their home from late fall to early spring, and every November you have a chance to view them and join in the celebration! See these beautiful birds in their natural habitat, along with other species including bald and golden eagles, whooping cranes, snow geese, black crowned night heron and many more. The Wildlife Refuge, operated by the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency, emphasizes the outdoors, conservation and wildlife education. It has been said that the Refuge is "...truly a treasure of Tennessee wildlife." For more information contact Meigs County Tourism (423) 334-3923

History

Nancy Ward Grave

At the age of 17, Nancy Ward earned the name of Ghighau or “Beloved Woman” for her valor on the battlefield after her husband, a Cherokee warrior, died in battle and she valiantly took his place, rallying her fellow fighters to victory. This act of bravery catapulted Nancy into many positions of power in the Cherokee governing systems, among them, the Women's Council and the Council of Chiefs. Her high standing among her people, her remarriage in the 1750s to English trader Bryant Ward, and her desire for peaceful coexistence made Nancy a trusted liaison to the newly arriving white settlers. Nancy would use her considerable influence in the Cherokee Nation innumerable times to negotiate peace treaties between both the English colonists and later, the emerging United States government and her native people. She is buried beside the graves of her son Five Killer and brother Long Fellow. In 1923, the Nancy Ward Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a monument on her grave. Newsweek.com named Nancy Ward 1 st on a timeline of women Political Pioneers.

Red Clay Historical Park

The last council grounds of the Cherokee Nation before their removal along the tragic Trail of Tears are located here. A Cherokee farm and council house of the period have been replicated to offer visitors a glimpse of how the area might have looked 150 years ago. The sacred council spring produces over 400,000 gallons of sapphire-blue water a day, providing the area's long-ago residents with fresh spring water. An interpretative center houses a theater, exhibits and artifacts. Recreational facilities include a 500-seat amphitheater, a picnic pavilion, picnic area with grills and tables, and a two-mile loop trail with a beautiful limestone overlook tower. Limited handicap accessibility. The park is open 8 a.m.-sunset, March to November; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., December-February, Closed December 22 to January 1. Take Blue Springs Road or Dalton Pike off Hwy. 64 Bypass and follow signs. 423-478-0339. Red Clay's Web Site.

Hair Conrad Cabin at Blythewood Farms

In the early 1800s, the area was inhabited primarily by Cherokees, among them Tekahskeh, or Hair Conrad as he came to be known. Conrad, a "man of means" and leader of the first detachment of Cherokees from Rattlesnake Springs on the infamous Trail of Tears, built his cabin in the architectural style of white settlers during the early 1800s. The cabin, the oldest residential structure in Bradley County, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Blythewood is a working farm, breeding championship show horses. It is best to call for a tour of the farm and cabin so someone can be there to greet you. 433 Blythewood Road SW, 423-476-8942

Cleveland Downtown Historic Walking Tour

A downtown walking tour allows you to personally experience Cleveland's unique history. Among the historic sites along the tour are Regions Bank, the oldest continuously operating bank building in Tennessee; The Spot, a unique restaurant built prior to 1900; and St. Luke's Episcopal Church, a Gothic Revival structure rich in local folklore. A copy of the self-guided tour brochure is available at the Convention & Visitors Bureau at 225 Keith Street, 423-472-6587 and at the Museum Center at 5ive Points , 200 Inman Street, 339-5745, where the tour begins.

Ducktown Basin Museum

Denuded red hills shimmer with glowing colors ranging from soft pastels to dark copper and reddish hues and are surrounded by a ring of deep purple mountains, giving the illusion of a basin or bowl, hence the name Ducktown Basin. The copper, used by the first inhabitants, the Cherokees, and "discovered" by European settlers in 1843, led to the growth of the copper industry in the region and the only copper mines of their kind in the Southeastern United States. The non-profit historical museum located in the Burra Burra Mine Historic District is the first state-owned historic industrial site and is noted on the National Register of Historic Places. May-October, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; November-April, Monday-Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Ducktown. 423-496-5778/PO Box 488, Ducktown, TN 37326. 423-496-5778

Museum Center at 5ive Points

The “River of Time” exhibit interprets seven time periods dating from prehistory to today, depicting the life and times of people who lived and worked in the Ocoee Region. Changing exhibits highlight topics such as Cherokee pottery, Civil War history, quilts and the early industrial era. Unique Museum store features high-end crafts and arts from teh Southern Appalachian region. Meeting facilities and catering available. Handicap accessible. Admission: $5 for adults and $4 for children and seniors. Open Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. 200 Inman Street. 423-339-5745. www.museumcenter.org

Historic Downtown

There is an interesting story around every corner and great events in every season.

Cleveland Downtown Historic Walking Tour

A downtown walking tour allows you to personally experience Cleveland's unique history. Among the historic sites along the tour are Regions Bank, the oldest continuously operating bank building in Tennessee; The Spot, a unique restaurant built prior to 1900; and St. Luke's Episcopal Church, a Gothic Revival structure rich in local folklore. A copy of the self-guided tour brochure is available at the Convention & Visitors Bureau at 225 Keith Street, 423-472-6587 and at the Museum Center at 5ive Points , 200 Inman Street, 339-5745, where the tour begins.

Cherokee Chieftain

The Cherokee Chieftain, carved from a tree along Parker Street by widely-acclaimed sculptor Peter Wolf Toth, was presented to the city of Cleveland, Tennessee as a gift in 1974. The Chieftain is the focal point of downtown Cleveland and stands as a proud reminder of the region's significant Cherokee Indian heritage. The Chieftain may be seen on the grounds of the Museum Center at 5ive Points on Inman Street.

Mainstreet Cleveland

In the spring of 2003 Mainstreet Cleveland, composed of city/county officials, volunteers and business people, focused on the goal of making downtown Cleveland a more vibrant place to work, live, shop and entertain.

Mainstreet Cleveland is a membership based organization, whose purpose is to promote and improve Cleveland's Historic Downtown. Mainstreet coordinates the Summer Cruise-In, Halloween Block Party, Carols in the City, Christmas Parade and many more events every year in Downtown Cleveland.

Museum Center at 5ive Points

The “River of Time” exhibit interprets seven time periods dating from prehistory to today, depicting the life and times of people who lived and worked in the Ocoee Region. The Museum Center includes a gift shop, cultural center and education center. Meeting facilities and catering available. Handicap accessible. Admission: $5 for adults and $4 for children and seniors. Open Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; closed Sunday and Monday. 200 Inman Street.
423-339-5745 www.museumcenter.org

Scenic Drives

Though many of us aren't thinking of taking "driving tours", when traveling through an area we must get from point 'a' to 'b.' Isn't it better to see lovely scenery and historic sites than miles and miles of interstate? For many the answer is still a resounding "Yes!" Here we offer an alternative to billboards and exit signs.

Cherohala Skyway

This beautiful 48-mile tour crosses through the Cherokee and Nantahala National Forests connecting Tellico Plains in Southeast Tennessee to Robbinsville, NC. Visit the above website or call the Monroe County, TN Department of Tourism at (800) 245-5428 for a free copy of the Cherohala Skyway brochure.

Hiwassee River Rail Adventure

The Hiwassee River Rail Adventure will start train rides out of Etowah, TN Saturday May 28, 2011. If you have enjoyed the train ride in the past we welcome you to come back again this year and bring your friends. There are two trips to choose from: The famous scenic "Hiwassee Loop" trip and the "Copperhill Special," which is an all day trip to the historic copper mining town of Copperhill where you can get off the train for lunch and shopping. Travel in enclosed vintage coaches and relax as you watch the beauty of the Hiwassee River and gorge pass you by.

Passport to Cherokee History

Travel back in time with this brochure exploring historic sites in the quaint southern towns of Charleston, Calhoun and Cleveland, Tennessee. The south side of the Hiwassee River, present-day Charleston, was once the location of the federal Cherokee Indian Agency (1820-1833), which provided protection for the Cherokee people. In prior years, this agency had been responsible for issuing passports for visitors to enter the Cherokee Nation. This brochure explores many of the significant Cherokee historical sites in Bradley County, such as the last eastern homeplace of Chief John Ross , the original home of his brother Lewis Ross , the non-extant location of Fort Cass and Rattlesnake Springs which were the infamous holding camps for the Cherokee during the first stage of the Trail of Tears.

Appalachian Quilt Trail

The AQT is a chance to experience the beauty of Tennessee and Appalachia in a new and unique way. Follow the colorful hand painted wooden quilt blocks that dot the landscape to find unique and authentic Appalachian experiences. You will find beauty and tranquility along historic byways. Take a hike on the Appalachian Trail, ride the rapids, stop in our shops and artist studios, shop our fresh farmers markets, cycle our scenic backroads, fish world-famous streams, birdwatch, or explore one of the largest underground caves in the country... Whatever your interests, there are an endless amount of things to do, places to stay, and events along the trail. Quilters and quilt lovers, there's something here for everyone in the family! Explore the Quilt Trail to find barn quilts but also, all manner of other attractions along the trail, marked by painted wooden AQT Heritage Quilt Squares .

For more information about the AQT contact Southeast RC& D Council at (423) 507-1252

Foster's Trail & Alpaca Farm

Foster's Trail & Alpaca Farm breeds and sells elite huacaya alpacas in Cleveland, Tennessee. We operate our Tennessee alpaca farm with a specific mission -- breed superior huacaya alpacas so our clients will benefit from our exceptional genetics in their own alpaca breeding programs. Our boutique farm, located in Cleveland, Tennessee, is set up to offer great customer service to our clients and top-quality care for our alpacas. Our foundation herd was carefully hand-picked with a variety of elite bloodlines including 4Peruvian Legacy, 2Peruvian Augusto, 2Peruvian Caligula, 2Peruvian Victor, 2Peruvian Felix, and Peruvian Hemingway. We have breeding quality alpacas for sale as well as fiber alpacas.

Whether you are just starting your own alpaca business or you are looking for that next great addition to your herd, we invite you to learn more about Foster's Trail and Alpaca Farm.

Chattanooga

Along the Tennessee River, the scenic city of Chattanooga lies directly to the southwest of the Ocoee Region and Cleveland, Tennessee. Tennessee's fourth largest city, Chattanooga is a bustling metropolis rich with scenic beauty. Perhaps one of the best places to see that beauty most clearly is high atop Lookout Mountain at Rock City Gardens . Located just six miles from downtown Chattanooga, Rock City is an enchanted 4,100-foot walking trail showcasing lush gardens, valley views from Lookout Mountain and soaring rock formations estimated to be 200 million years old. A 100-foot waterfall cascades over Lover's Leap; a swing-along bridge spans nearly 200 feet and offers thrilling views to the adventurous souls who cross it. More than a half-million people from all over the world visit each year. Rock City Gardens is open year round every day except Christmas Day 8:30 a.m.- closing times vary by season. Enjoy Rock City's Enchanted Garden of Lights November 15 – January 4, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. “Rock City will amaze you. It's in our nature.” 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mtn., GA . (706) 820-2531

After you've gone through Fat Man's Squeeze or swooned over Lover's Leap at Rock City, check out Chattanooga's downtown area. Following a $125 million revitalization in May 2005, the city's skyline has seen a major improvement. Take a stroll through downtown and get a bite to eat. How about a taking the family out to the ballgame? The Chattanooga Lookouts are the Double A affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers and a charter member of the Southern League. Scheduled play begins at AT&T Park in April and concludes in September with playoffs after the regular season. The park is handicap accessible. Tickets can be purchased online or at various locations downtown.
201 Power Alley, Chattanooga. (423) 267-2208

After a long night at the ball field, you'll be ready to come back to your “home base” in Cleveland, Tennessee. The Ocoee Region and its surrounding fun offer so much to do…you'll want to be well-rested to get up and start your new adventure the next morning!

Religious Attractions

The Church of God International Office & Prayer Plaza

Since 1904, Cleveland has been the headquarters for the international offices of the Church of God, one of America's oldest continuing Pentacostal denominations. More than 6.5 million people claim Church of God membership around the world. A 24-acre campus at the corner of Keith and 25th streets is a beautiful asset to the city and includes three major office buildings and a Prayer Garden that is accessible to the city's Greenway. The Leadership and Communications Center contains a small conference center that is available for public use. Office hours are 8 a.m.- 5 p.m., Monday - Friday, with the Prayer Garden open 24/7. 2490 Keith St. (423) 472-3361

Lee University

A private, Christ-Centered liberal arts university operated by the Church of God. Lee began life as a Bible Training School in 1918. After a hiatus, (the college briefly relocated to Sevierville ) the school returned to its current location in 1947, relocating to buildings once owned by Centenary College, a Methodist women's school, and Bob Jones College. The buildings once owned by Bob Jones include the dormitory and classroom used by Billy Graham while he matriculated in 1936. The University has now grown into the largest Christian institution in Tennessee and the second largest of Tennessee's 35 accredited private colleges and universities. This liberal arts institution offers bachelor's degrees in more than 48 majors in over 100 programs of study and also offers 15 master's degrees. Lee University is located at 1120 Ocoee Street. (423) 614-8000

Dixon Pentecostal Research Center

Housed on the campus of Lee University. the Dixon Pentecostal Research Center contains one of the largest collection of Pentecostal books and media in the world as well as the archives of the Church of God. The Research Center includes the "Pentecostal Heritage Exhibit" - a changing exhibit that depicts various aspects of the history of the Church of God. The Research Center and exhibit are open to the public. 260 11th St. (423) 614-8576

North Cleveland Church Of God

North Cleveland Church of God is the oldest continuing Church of God in the nation. Organized in 1907, the church facilities now include a 2,400 seat sanctuary and a prayer center. 335 11th St. (423) 476-5513

Pathway Press

Home of Church of God publishing and Tennessee Music and Printing Company, one of the world's largest producer's of shaped-note song books and "southern gospel" music. The press also publishes the music of James D. Vaughn, the father of southern gospel music. The revitalization of this music by Bill Gaither's "Homecoming" videotapes and DVDs made this style a growing industry. This was also the location of the Church of God headquarters from 1935 until 1968. The press offers public tours two times per day. 1080 Montgomery Ave. (800) 553-8506

Tomlinson House

Born in Indiana in 1865, Ambrose Jessup (A.J.) Tomlinson came to the south as a "mountain missionary," establishing a ministry base in Culbertson, NC in 1899. He joined the Church of God in 1903, and moved to Cleveland, Tennessee the following year. After moving to Cleveland in 1904, he purchased the house at 2525 Gaut St. One legend claims he got a good price on the house because it was supposedly haunted. In 1909, the Church elected him their first general overseer. Subsequently, his home would become their first "headquarters." After differences of opinion prompted the church to remove Tomlinson from office in 1923, he left the Church of God and helped form the Church of God of Prophesy. His house, in turn, also played host to the headquarters for this new organization.

Grave of A.J. Tomlinson

The grave of A.J. Tomlinson and several other Church of God overseers of the Church of God are buried in Fort Hill Cemetery on Ocoee Street in Cleveland, as well as in nearby Hilcrest Cemetery. Fort Hill is the final resting place for many of Cleveland's prominent founding citizens.

St. Luke's Episcopal Church and Mausoleum

Organized in 1867, this Gothic Revival Style church was built by John H. Craigmiles to honor the memory of his 7-year-old daughter, Nina, who was tragically killed when the buggy she was riding with her grandfather was struck by a train. The incident occured on St. Luke's Day, October 18, 1871. The accompanying mausoleum is built of carrera marble with walls that are four feet thick. Nina's sarcophagus was modeled by Italian sculptor Fabia Cotte. The church and mausoleum were placed on the National Historic Register of Historic Places in 1982.

First Presbyterian Church

First Presbyterian Church has the oldest existing sanctuary in Cleveland. Established in 1837, construction on this building began in 1856 and the church was dedicated in October of 1858. Beginning in 1935, a remodeling project introduced a three-story addition and made significant changes to the sanctuary. During this time the original gallery, once used by slaves prior to the Civil War, was removed, and the sanctuary was enlarged and redecorated. During the Civil War, the sanctuary was damaged. Musket balls are still embedded in the church steeple. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. 433 Ocoee St. (423) 476-5584

Broad Street Methodist

Like the congregation of First Presbyterian, Broad Street Methodist was established in 1837. In 1849 the church served as the host of the first session of the Holston Conference to be held in the Ocoee Region. The original church was constructed on the site in 1867, but made way for the current edifice which was built in 1893. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. 263 Broad St. (423) 476-5586

Charleston Cumberland Presbyterian Church
This Greek-Revival style church served as a confederate hospital in 1863. That November, Troops of Company C of the First Tennessee Calvary, CSA, who came largely from neighboring McMinn and Monroe counties, helped to evacuate the town of Charleston. The unit then joined the 38th Tennessee Infantry, led by Col. John C. Carter in occupying this town. The window sills of this building are gnawed considerably, evidence of where the soldiers horses were tethered.


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